Loss of innocence

by Russell on January 21, 2012

Once upon a time …

Oooops. That’s the standard start to a fantasy story. The fantasy in question? That modern global marketing mega-companies sales will miss a single dollar or permit our children to enjoy their childhood – as children. Far better if they are dragged – and the companies are very cunning to ensure it isn’t kicking and screaming – out of the innocence of childhood and into that more important category – consumer.

Admittedly, a lot of the marketing is aimed at women – sorry – girls. Just look at what is offered to kids as young as ten. And the toys follow suit. One of my favourite scenes from “Love Actually” is the mother shopping for dolls for Christmas presents. She can’t decide between the two available, one looks like a transvestite, the other like a hooker. Just what messages are the low-life’s who design all this stuff thinking? What are they thinking? Oh yes, I almost forgot. $$$$$$$$

Ten year old modelWe see kids ten years old modeling outfits so short, if they hiccup their panties will show. Ten year olds who look like high class hookers. Great if you happen to be one of those deviant pedophiles but what happened to innocence. Oh yeah, innocence doesn’t fill the cash register.

 

And the latest growing trend, kiddy exercise machines for children as young as three. Excuse me! I have a couple of suggestions here. Confiscate their PSP/Xbox and send them outside to play.

 

What the hell has happened to this world. Once upon a time – there I go again with the whole fantasy thing – we celebrated our childhood for as long as we could. We will never get it back. Why is western society so hell bent in stripping us our innocence? It’s akin to telling your five year old about Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy.

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Cynthia January 21, 2012 at 9:10 pm

Well put, Russell. And remember, if we don’t buy it, they’ll stop making it. Come on, parents, you can say it . . . “NO.” The word has a profound effect when you stand behind it.

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